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-----> Watch and Sip

Enjoy some of your favorite movies while tasting our selected wines or cocktails.
Every month, Marie and Sam will chose some classic films to be projected on the screen behind the bar of the lounge. From silent chef-d'oeuvres to unforgettable musical we will pay tribute to the talented people of the cinema.
You will find below a list of our monthly selection.

July 2013
Tour de France from the sky + The Triplets of Belleville : July is the cycling month!
This month, we will feature a document about the mythic "Grande Boucle" filmed from the sky: enjoy this world famous cycling competition like you've never seen it before! PLUS our favorite animation movie: The Triplets of Belleville.
The Triplets of Belleville is a strange, largely wordless animated feature by French filmmaker Sylvain Chomet. It tells the story of Madame Souza, an elderly woman who goes on a quest to rescue her grandson Champion, a Tour de France cyclist, who has been kidnapped by the French mafia for gambling purposes and taken to the city of Belleville. She is joined by the Triplets of Belleville, music hall singers from the 1930s. The film is left to the visuals to convey the storyline relying on facial expressions and body language to spell out the major plot points with distortion of shape, line and form, particularly in regards to the human figures. The film was highly praised for it retro animation style.


on screen:
The Triplets of Bellevile • 2003


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

June 2013
Germaine Dulac: writer, artist, and filmmaker
Germaine Dulac, the most prominent feminist writer, artist and filmmaker of her time. One of the avant-garde cinematographers of the 1920s, Dulac saw film as a new art form for expressing ideas and conveying images in a way which would be impossible or inappropriate in other artistic media. Her films are closer to abstract art or music than conventional cinema, are either surrealist or symbolic (indeed often both), and often revolve around feminine themes. There is a striking originality and distinctiveness in her work that sets her apart from her contemporaries, and her films are undeniably feminine (in the most positive sense).

on screen:
La souriante Madame Beudet • 1923
La coquille et le clergyman • 1928
L'invitation au voyage • 1927
Thèmes et variations • 1928
Celles qui s'en font • 1928
Danses espagnoles • 1928


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

May 2013
Méliès Le Magicien
Georges Méliès was one of the most important pioneers of early cinema. Before making films, he was a stage magician but became interested in film after seeing a demonstration of the Lumière brothers' camera. Méliès built the world's first movie studio near Paris; from it cascaded fantastic magic films, dream films, historical reconstructions, imaginary journeys, melodramas, and slapstick comedies - even erotic films. He directed 531 films between 1896 and 1914, ranging in length from one to fourty minutes. Because of his ability to seemingly manipulate and transform reality with the cinematography, Méliès is sometimes referred to as the "Cinemagician."

on screen:
First Wizard of Cinema • Méliès' work from 1896-1913


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

April 2013
Charley Chase: one of the great geniuses of Hollywood's golden era of silent comedy
Charles Joseph Parrott of Baltimore, Maryland started out in vaudeville during the rough and tumble days in the first decade of the 20th century. This young man fresh off the stage, started working at the Christie Film Company. During the next decade he worked as a juvenile lead, a gag writer and a comedy director. When he changed his name to Charley Chase and found himself featured in the Hal Roach's short comedies, he became one of the great geniuses and stars of Hollywood's golden era of silent comedy. As renowned as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd at the time, Chase easily matched them laugh for laugh. The always-dapper Chase specialized in portraying the pleasant common man with very common skills placed in the most uncommon of circumstances.

on screen:
April's fool • 1924
The fraidy cat • 1924
Bad boy • 1925
The caretaker's daughter • 1926
Be your age • 1926
Bromo and Juliet • 1925
Dog shy • 1926
Charley my boy • 1926


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

February 2013
Cecil B. DeMille: one of the most successful filmmakers in Holywood history
Cecil B. DeMille was one of the most successful filmmakers in Hollywood history. Out of the seventy films he claimed as his personal productions, all but six turned a profit, and he remained a leading director of "A" list features from his first film in 1914 to his last in 1956. He was one of the first directors in Hollywood to become a celebrity in his own right. Though DeMille was respected by his peers, his individual films were often criticized by them. "Directorially, I think his pictures were the most horrible things I've ever seen in my life", said director William Wellman. "But he put on pictures that made a fortune. In that respect, he was better than any of us." Among his best-known films are Cleopatra, Samson and Delilah, The Greatest Show on Earth, and The Ten Commandments but many of his films were romantic sexual comedies like the trilogy of Marriage and Divorce.

on screen:
Don't change your husband • 1919
Why change your wife • 1920


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

January 2013
Buster Keaton: one of the best director of all time
Joseph Frank "Buster" Keaton was an American comic actor, filmmaker, producer and writer. He was best known for his silent films, in which his trademark was physical comedy with a consistently stoic attitude. Born to a pair of medicine show performers, Buster seemed destined for show business. He reputedly made his first appearance on stage crawling on from the wings at the age of nine months. His innate comic gifts were already evident in his first performances; he would stand behind his father, dressed in an identical costume, and, unplanned and unrehearsed, mouth the words of his father's monologue as a silent and grotesque Greek chorus. Buster Keaton (his lifelong stage name) was recognized as the seventh greatest director of all time.

on screen:
The garage • 1920
Neighbors • 1920
One week • 1920
The balloonatic • 1923
The general • 1926


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

December 2012
René Clair: An Immortal Movie Maker
After working for a while as a journalist, René Clair soon discovered a passion for cinema while acting in some of Louis Feuillade's films. He made his first film in 1924, "Paris qui dort", a comic satire with a science-fiction theme. Clair developed his penchant for satirical surrealism in films which were highly regarded at the time and which are now considered to be masterpieces. He made one film in Great Britain before moving to the United States where he directed half a dozen more down-to-earth films. René Clair is now universally regarded as one of the most significant figures in French cinema history. His wit, imagination and drive helped French cinema to maintain its pre-eminent position in the 1920s and 30s. To acknowledge this fact, he was elected to the French Academy in 1962, the first film director to receive this great accolade.
on screen:
Le Million • 1931
An impoverished artist discovers he has purchased a winning lottery ticket at the very moment his creditors come to collect. The only problem is, the ticket is in the pocket of his coat... which he left at his girlfriend's apartment... who gave the coat to a man hiding from the police... who sells the coat to an opera singer who uses it during a performance. By turns charming and inventive, René Clair's lyrical masterpiece had a profound impact on not only the Marx Brothers and Charlie Chaplin, but on the American musical as a whole.

XMAS' EVE SPECIAL SCREENING
Christmas comes but once a year, a time of nostalgia with those Christmas movies everyone might have seen but not always in their old black & white version...

on screen:
A holiday pageant at home • 1901
A Winter straw ride • 1906
A trap for Santa • 1909
A Christmas accident • 1912
The adventure of the wrong Santa Claus • 1914
Santa Claus vs Cupid • 1915
Santa Claus • 1925
The night before Christmas • 1905


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

November 2012
Abel Gance: A genius with artistic courage
Abel Gance was a French film director and producer, writer and actor. One of the most important figures in the development of cinema as an art, a genius whose artistic courage and humanist vision created masterpieces that inspired many other directors, from his silent film contemporaries in the 1920s to the French Nouvelle Vague of the 1950s and 1960s. Constantly experimenting with new techniques to express his view of life on screen, Gance expanded the possibilities of film as an art beyond any of his contemporaries. Yet, he never lost sight of humanity, inspiring his players to give intense and vital performances in narratives whose sweep embraced both epic grandeur and lyric tenderness. Gance's vision was at once romantic and realistic, the hero was rather an individual of tremendous creativity and insight whose tragedy resulted both from the fierce opposition of an entrenched establishment and the reality of his own human limitations. The Gance protagonist was ultimately isolated from mass society because of his failure to adapt to its fundamental conservatism which is in constant tension with its simultaneous yearning for revolutionary transformation. Expressing these conflicts in his work, Abel Gance created films that are unique and timeless in their dynamic portrayal of the triumphs and dilemmas of humanity in its search for the ideal. He is best known for three major silent films: J'accuse (1919), La Roue (1923), and the monumental Napoléon (1927).
on screen:
La Roue • 1923



Please note that the selection is subject to change.

October 2012
Lon Chaney: The Man with the thousand faces
Lon Chaney is regarded as one of the most versatile and powerful actors of early cinema, renowned for his characterizations of tortured, often grotesque and afflicted characters. Due to his special make-up effects he carried the characterization to be "the man with the thousand faces". As a child of deaf adults, Chaney became skilled in pantomime, and found stage work early. He toured as a comic song and dance man before attempting a screen career. Lon Chaney's greatest success came in two dramatic roles, "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1924) and "The Phantom of The Opera" (1925).
on screen:
He who gets slapped • 1924
The ace of hearts • 1921



Please note that the selection is subject to change.

September 2012
W.C. Fields: from juggling to movie star
W.C. Field's early films featured one of his two comic types: either the con man-braggart or the henpecked husband, and he was renowned for his fondness for using flowery verbiage, silly names and muttered asides. Fields became a major star in his mid-50s. W.C. Fields was born the oldest child of a poor Philadelphia family, and he ran away from home aged 11. Self-educated, he started off as a juggler and it was this skill that allowed him to break into show business. By the early 1900s, he was touring the world, regularly called the world's greatest juggler. By the age of twenty he was a comic star in vaudeville. In Paris, he starred at the Folies-Bergere along with Charles Chaplin and Maurice Chevalier, and had a string of successes in musical on Broadway. Fields' first movie was made in 1915 for Mutual: he was thirty-six years old, and also began writing his own screenplays. Most of Field's films were "acquired tastes", more often praised by the critics than favored by the public. Fields' movie career blossomed with the arrival of sound, and he moved permanently to Hollywood. Amongst his greatest films were those of the thirties - "It's a Gift" in 1934, "You Can't Cheat an Honest Man" in 1939, and, especially, "The Bank Dick" in 1940. His characteristic portrayal of the beleaguered "everyman" figure made him a national institution.
on screen:
It's a gift • 1934
The bank Dick • 1940



Please note that the selection is subject to change.

August 2012
The work of Julien Duvivier
Although unquestionably one of the most important film-makers in the history of French cinema, Julien Duvivier has never achieved the status accorded to other great directors of his country. The main reason for this was perhaps Duvivier's versatility, his ability and willingness to tackle a wide range of subjects of varying degrees of merit. This kind of aesthetic arrogance made him an easy target for fickle journalists and academics. Duvivier made popular melodramas, thrillers, religious epics, comedies, wartime propaganda, musicals, and literary adaptations of novels by Émile Zola, Leo Tolstoy. Jean Renoir once said "If I was an architect and I had to build a monument to the cinema, I would place a statue of (Julien) Duvivier above the entrance." His first notable movie was "Poil de Carotte". "Au Bonheur des Dames" was his last silent movie but his international success came with "Pepe-le-Moko".
on screen:
Poil de carotte • 1925
Au bonheur des dames • 1930



Please note that the selection is subject to change.

July 2012
The Triplets of Belleville
"The Triplets of Belleville" is a strange, largely wordless animated feature by French filmmaker Sylvain Chomet. It tells the story of Madame Souza, an elderly woman who goes on a quest to rescue her grandson champion, a Tour de France cyclist, who has been kidnapped by the French mafia for gambling purposes and taken to the city of Belleville. She is joined by the Triplets of Belleville, music-hall singers from the 1930s. The film uses the visuals to convey the storyline relying on facial expressions and body language to spell out the major plot points with distortion of shape, line and form, particularly in regards to the human figures. This film was highly praised for it retro animation style.
on screen:
Les Triplets de Belleville • 2003



Please note that the selection is subject to change.

June 2012
Charles R. Bowers: Le Bricolo
Charles R. Bowers' life details are sketchy. We know that he was born in Iowa in 1889, and a 1928 press book bio claims that his parents were a French countess and an Irish doctor, that at age five a tramp circus performer taught him to walk the tightrope, and that at six the circus kidnapped him, after which he didn't return home for two years. Even prior to his starring career, his work was familiar to millions of movie fans with hundreds of cartoon shorts based on the "Mutt & Jeff" comic strips that he wrote, produced, and directed. By the late 20s, he was starring in his own series of slapstick comedies. His comedies are a mixture of live action and animation. His character, often a foolish ne'er-do-well or eccentric inventor, uses stop-motion animation, pixilation, amazing sets and props as well as Bowers' wild imagination. Bowers sacrificed characterization for a great gag, and his plots often stopped dead in their tracks in order to pull off a bravura piece of animation. Although he was forgotten for decades and his name was notably absent from most histories of the Silent Era, his surviving films after the rediscovery of his work has sometimes been placed in the "top tier" of silent film accomplishments.
on screen:
Egged on • 1926
He done his best • 1926
A wild roomer • 1926
Fatal footstep • 1926
Now you tell one • 1926
Many a slip • 1927
Nothing doing • 1927
There it is • 1928
The extra quick lunch • 1917
A.W.O.L. • 1918
Say Ah-h! • 1928
It's a bird • 1930
Believe it or don't • 1935
Pete Roleum and his cousins • 1939
Wild oysters • 1940
A sleepless night • 1940



Please note that the selection is subject to change.

May 2012
Laurel and Hardy: the most famous duo of the 20th century
The most popular and successful comedy team in entertainment history was Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, the timid thin one and the bossy fat one, who made an unbroken string of shorts (20 minutes each, as many as 13 a year) from 1927 to 1935. Since they began so near the 1929 arrival of full sound, and moved into talkies more smoothly than practically any other stars, comic or otherwise, it is often forgotten that they began in silent.  Indeed, purists have always maintained that the best of Laurel and Hardy were their silent two-reelers-all made in the first two years of the team's existence-and that the level of hilarity they achieved without dialog was never matched in the talking era, even though their voices perfectly suited the pantomimed personas they had so brilliantly established. These rare silent comedy classics have been collected in "The Lost Films of Laurel and Hardy" and represent the formative years during which Stan Laurel first developed and honed all the gags and set pieces that this legendary comedy team would use during their entire film history.
on screen:
Liberty • 1929
We faw down • 1928
The lucky dog • 1926
Along came auntie • 1926
Love'em and weep • 1927
That's my wife • 1929
Flying elephants • 1928
Putting pants on Philip • 1928
Crazy like a fox • 1926
The soilers • 1923
45 minutes for Hollywood • 1926


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

April 2012
Marion Davies: from Brooklyn to Hollywood
Born in Brooklyn, Marion Davies found herself in demand as a model for famous painters of the day upon leaving school. By the time William Randolph Hearst, America's most famous publisher, met her she had already made a name for herself on the Broadway stage. With Hearst as mentor, she was on her way to being the most famously advertised actress in the world pressuring the studios to cast her in historical dramas to which she was not suited. Davies herself was more inclined to develop her comic talents, but Hearst pointedly discouraged this. From 1918 and for the next decade she appeared in twenty-nine films, an average of almost three films a year. She was a tireless worker. Davies was genuinely talented and might have had a more rewarding career but Hearst's patronage did more harm than good. For this reason, she is better remembered as Hearst's mistress and Hollywood's premiere hostess. Her parties at the fabulous beach house Hearst had built at Santa Monica attracted the days biggest stars. Dignitaries from all over the world were eager to accept her invitations. She never took herself seriously and was beloved by all who knew her. "The Patsy" is one of the largest hits of her career, a perfectly-tooled vehicle for her comic talent.
on screen:
The Patsy • 1928


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

March 2012
Pioneer Women in Silent Movies: Constance Talmadge
Born Constance Alice Talmadge in Brooklyn, New York, she is the younger sister of Norma Talmadge and older sister of Natalie Talmadge - all of whom went into films. From her earliest film roles, it was obvious that Constance's forte was to be comedy. Her eyes sparkled, she laughed constantly and was always coming out with witty one liners. Her first major role was as The Mountain Girl and Marguerite de Valois in "Intolerance" (1916). She appeared mostly in light romantic comedies, usually playing willful young women in constant misunderstandings with the men in their lives. In their own times Constance Talmadge was the lower profile sister, but today she is more familiar than Norma. Among the first people to place their footprints and handprints in the forecourt of Grauman's Chinese Theatre. To make her panel unique, she walked across it leaving five footprints.
on screen:
Her night of romance • 1924
Her sister from Paris • 1925


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

February 2012
The Great Joséphine Baker
+ Special Screening on Valentine's Day: "City lights" with Charlie Chaplin

Josephine Baker arrived in Paris to become a dancer in "La Revue Nègre". She was nineteen and became virtually an instant hit; Josephine Baker became one of the best-known entertainers in France and much of Europe. Her exotic, sensual act reinforced the creative images coming out of the Harlem Renaissance in America. As a woman, Josephine was decorated for her undercover work for the French Résistance during World War II. She was also a civil rights activist. She refused to perform for segregated audiences and integrated the Las Vegas nightclubs. She adopted twelve children from around the world whom she called her "Rainbow Tribe". She became the first American woman to receive French military honors at her funeral.
on screen:
Siren of the Tropics • 1927
La Revue des Revues • 1927
on screen Tuesday, February 14:
City lights • 1931
The tale of blind love again presents the famous Little Tramp character - an outcast, homeless man with his baggy pants, tight coat, cane, large shoes and small hat who first appeared in 1914. She thinks The Tramp is rich because she mistakenly believes she heard him exit a car, while she sits on a sidewalk corner. He buys a flower but soon the real owner of the car leaves, making her think The Tramp has left. At this moment Chaplin has become smitten with her. He vows to help her restore her sight by saving enough money so she can go to Vienna where a doctor has found a cure...


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

January 2012
Laurel & Hardy: A Timeless Fame
Laurel and Hardy were one of the most popular and critically acclaimed comedy double acts of the early Classical Hollywood era of American cinema. Composed of thin Englishman Stan Laurel and heavy American Oliver Hardy, they became well known during the late 1920s to the mid-1940s for their slapstick comedy, with Laurel playing the clumsy and childlike friend of the pompous Hardy. Prior to the double act both were established actors with Laurel appearing in over 50 films and Hardy in over 250 films. They officially became a team in 1927, and in total they appeared together in 107 films over 20 years.
on screen:
Lucky dog • 1917
The sawmill • 1921
Mud and sand • 1923
Oranges and lemons • 1923
West of Hot Dog • 1924
The adventure of the wrong Santa Claus • 1914
and more...

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

December 2011
Xmas Movies Nostalgia
Christmas comes but once a year, a time of nostalgia with those Christmas movies everyone might have seen but not always in their old black & white version. A collection of nine early movies evoking the Victorian charm under the Christmas spirit, "Christmas Past" offer a nostalgic peek, a staple for the holiday season. Enjoy "Christmas Carol", a holiday classic, the most successful story ever written by Charles Dickens.
on screen:
Christmas Carol & Old Scrooge • 1923
A holiday pageant at home • 1901
A Winter straw ride • 1906
A trap for Santa • 1909
A Christmas accident • 1912
The adventure of the wrong Santa Claus • 1914
Santa Claus vs Cupid • 1915
Santa Claus • 1925
The night before Christmas • 1905

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

November 2011
Monty Banks: A Forgotten Artist
Little remembered today, Monty Banks was a comedian/dancer who emigrated from his native Italy to America in 1914. He appeared in stage musicals, and then embarked upon a film career, starring in several lively comedy shorts and features of the 1920s. The most famous of these was "Play Safe" which was capped by a breathtaking runaway-train sequence that has since been excerpted in several comedy-film compilations.
on screen:
The covered schooner • 1923
Wedding bells • 1924
Pay or move • 1924
Golf bug • 1924
Play safe • 1926

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

October 2011
Jean Durand: A Key Figure
Jean Durand was a key figure in the development of early French cinema. His large body of work between 1907 and 1929 helped define his country's unique slapstick comedy, and action-adventure films. Jean Durand was considered on of the master of the form, both for the quality of his films and the influence he had upon life style. He directed hundreds of films specializing in comedies and adventure drama, including a number of American-style Western movies. Jean Durand assembled a bestiary of supporting players introducing elephants, lions, snakes as well as acrobatic actors into his farces and thrillers.
on screen:
Zigoto drives a locomotive • 1912
Onésime loves animals • 1913
The railway of death • 1912
and many more...

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

September 2011
Jacques Feyder : Poetic Realism
Jacques Feyder was a Belgian screenwriter and film director who worked principally in France, but also in the USA, Britain and Germany. He was a leading director of silent films during the 1920s, and in the 1930s he became associated with the style of poetic realism in French cinema. His style was characterized by a classical balance and moderation, composition of images that was beautiful without becoming gratuitous. Above all his films achieved an atmosphere of realism, whether through the accumulation of judiciously chosen detail, the use of location shooting, or the use of elaborately designed sets. His adherence to a realistic tradition in French cinema pointed the way to the vogue for poetic realism.
on screen:
Heads... and women who use them • 1916
Friendly advice • 1916
Biscot on the wrong floor • 1916
Face of children • 1925

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

August 2011
Emile Cohl: Father of the Animated Cartoon
Emile Cohl was a French caricaturist of the largely forgotten "Incoherent Movement", a cartoonist and animator. Called "The Father of the Animated Cartoon", Cohl made "Fantasmagorie" in 1908: it is considered the first fully animated film ever made. It was made up of 700 drawings, each of which was double-exposed (animated "on twos"), leading to a running time of almost two minutes.
on screen:
Fantasmagoria • 1908
The puppet's nightmare • 1908
The living fan • 1909
Comic mutations • 1909
The 12 labors of Hercules • 1910
Petit Faust • 1910
Bebe's masterpiece • 1910
...and more

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

July 2011
A compilation of rarely seen funny silent movies
This compilation caters to fans of silent comedy by offering four rarely-seen humorous shorts, starring such once-legendary actors as Ben Turpin, Paul Parrott, and Snub Pollar.
on screen:
Air Pockets • 1924
Don't butt in • 1926
Grab the ghost • 1920
The daredevil • 1923

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

June 2011
Georges Méliès: le "Cinémagicien" honored at the Cannes Festival
The 64th Cannes film Festival has featured several rare historic George Méliès' iconic movies. Georges Méliès was one of the most important pioneers of early cinema. Before making films, he was a stage magician but became interested in movies after seeing a demonstration of the Lumière brothers' camera. Méliès built the world's first movie studio near Paris; from it cascaded fantastic magic films, dream films, historical reconstructions, imaginary journeys, melodramas, and slapstick comedies - even erotic films. He directed 531 films between 1896 and 1914, ranging in length from one to fourty minutes. Due to his ability to seemingly manipulate and transform reality with the cinematography, Méliès is sometimes referred to as the "Cinemagician."
on screen:
First Wizard of Cinema
Various Work • 1896-1913

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

May 2011
The King of Hollywood: Douglas Fairbanks
An actor, screenwriter, director and producer. Douglas Fairbanks began acting at an early age, and under the watchful eye of D.W. Griffith, Fairbanks became a star almost instantly, playing in light social and romantic comedies. In 1916, Douglas started his own company "The Douglas Fairbanks Film Corporation", and by 1920, Fairbanks had completed twenty-nine films (twenty-eight features and one two-reel short). His athletic prowess, gallant romanticism, and natural sincerity made him "King of Hollywood" during the 1920s and after his marriage with Mary Pickford, the couple became Hollywood royalty. He had the inspiration of staging a new type of adventure-costume picture, a genre that was then out of favor with the public, making his famous costume pictures, such as "The Mark of Zorro" (1920), "The Three Musketeers", (1921) and "Robin Hood". (1921). With Pickford, Charlie Chaplin, and Griffith, Fairbanks founded the United Artists Corporation in 1919 as a distribution outlet for independently produced films. Finally, by the time sound came in, he stopped acting in 1936. He and Pickford placed their hand and foot prints in wet cement at the newly opened Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood on April 30, 1927. Fairbanks was elected first President of the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences that same year, and he presented the first Academy Awards Ceremony at the Roosevelt Hotel. Fairbanks also has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7020, Hollywood Boulevard.
on screen:

His picture in the papers • 1916
The mystery of the leaping fish • 1916
Flirting with fate • 1916

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

April 2011
Comedy, Comedy, Comedy
Almost eighty years past the end of the silent movie era, silent comedy is still alive with a series of the funniest actors of the silent era, the best-loved comedians in slapstick film as Charlie Chaplin, Charley Chase and Snub Pollard... Some are still well-known, some have been forgotten, but all of them were the stars of the silent comedy that influenced the modern comedy.
on screen:

April's Fool • 1924 - starring Charley Chase
Caught in the Rain • 1914 - starring Charlie Chaplin
Reckless Rosie • 1929
Sold at Auction • 1923 - starring Snub Pollard
Smithy • 1924 - starring Stan Laurel & James Finlayson
War Feathers • 1926 - starring Our Gang

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

March 2011
First Ladies - Early Women Filmmakers
Before the consolidation of Hollywood's studio system, women as Alice Guy-Blaché, Lois Weber, Ruth Ann Baldwin, Dorothy Reid and Cleo Madison were among the most prominent and prolific film directors of the silent era. The mid-1910s was a virtual golden age for women directors, with over a dozen women working behind the camera. Alice Guy-Blaché (the world's first woman director) was in her 20+ years as a film pioneer while Ruth Ann Baldwin was at the beginning of her all-too-brief career as writer/director, and they worked together on "The Ocean Waif" and "49-17". The most important of all American women directors, Lois Weber entered film-making in 1907 and has directed the most controversial movie of the silent area. Along with a successful actress, Madison was one of many women who directed films at Universal, particularly in the mid 1910s. "Hypocrites" propelled Weber to the front ranks of directors. Dorothy Davenport Reid was a member of one of America's premiere theatrical families and a promising young actress that started her own production company, whose first project was "The Red Kimona" based on a real story.
on screen:

The Ocean Waif + 49-17 • 1916-1917
Both feminist parodies, featuring "pure young women" who are menaced by evil men and saved by good ones.
Hypocrites • 1915
Follows the parallel stories of an early Christian ascetic and a modern minister, with most actors in dual roles.
The Red Kimona • 1925
Based on the infamous true story of a young girl who is tricked into a life of prostitution in New Orleans and goes on trial for murdering her pimp/love.

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

February 2011
The Lubitsch Touch
Born in 1892 in Berlin, Germany, Ernst Lubitsch became very young a successful comedian but soon began writing and directing his own films and gave up acting. He moved to the US in 1920 with an immediate success. Ernst Lubitsch grasped the American psychology with an amazing accuracy and focused his satire on two main themes -- sex and money and became known as "The Lubitsch Touch" a long list of virtues: sophistication, style, subtlety, wit, charm, elegance, suavity, polished nonchalance and audacious sexual nuance. His chain of triumphs during the silent period remained unbroken even during the delicate transition to sound, and Lubitsch became the most widely imitated comic filmmaker of the sound era.
on screen:

The Mariage Circle • 1924
Eternal love • 1929

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

January 2011
Max Linder
Born in France to a Catholic winemaker family, Max Linder grew up with a passion for the theatre and became fascinated with motion pictures. In 1905, he took a job with Pathé Frères and become a comedic actor, director, screenwriter, as well as a producer. Max Linder created what was probably the first identifiable motion-picture character who appeared in successive situation comedies. Linder made more than one hundred short films portraying "Max," a wealthy and dapper man-about-town frequently in hot water because of his penchant for beautiful women and the good life. After an unsuccessful try in the United States but having made several hundred short films, he all but gave up on the business and his life ended sadly.
on screen:

Max learns to skate • 1905
The legend of Ponchinella • 1907
Max fears the dogs • 1909
Max and the Quinquina • 1911
...and more

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

December 2010
Our Gang, The Little Rascals
"Our Gang", in 1920 was a series of American comedy short films about a group of poor neighborhood children and the adventures they had together. Created by comedy producer Hal Roach, "Our Gang" rooted in real life: the majority of the children were poor, and the gang was often put at odds with snobbish "rich kids", officious adults and parents, and other such adversaries. "Our Gang" also notably put boys, girls, whites and blacks together in a group as equals, something that "broke new ground. Such a thing had never been done before in cinema but was commonplace after the success of "Our Gang". Featuring over forty-one child actors, the series is noted for showing children behaving in a relatively natural way, some became adult stars. In 1950, "The little Rascals, Our Gang" went on television and comic books.
on screen:

Derby day • 1923
Big business • 1924
Monkey business • 1924
Love my dog • 1927
...and more

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

November 2010
A Festival of Silent Comedy
Some are still well-known, some have been forgotten but all of them were the stars of the early cinema. Most of them have started their career performing in Vaudeville & Nickelodeon before being drawn to the motion picture business:
on screen:

A cure for Pokeritis • Jonh Bunny - 1912
John Bunny's popularity can be attributed to the succulent fun of the music hall and the circus, not the dry wit of sophisticated comedies.
A bedroom scandal • Montague (Monty) Banks - 1921
Star in many silent short comedies, his strong European accent forced him to phase out his acting career in favor of working as a gagman and director.
The bakery • Larry Semon - 1921
Slapstick comedian known for his charming, white-painted face and clownish smile, mugged his way to being a very highly paid and popular actor.
The ropin' fool • Will Rogers - 1922
Placed in the Guiness Book of World Records for throwing three lassos at once, Will Rogers has started his career as cow-boy in some show but move to acting is silent and talking film with great success and was voted the most popular male actor in Hollywood.
Mickey in school • Mickey Rooney - 1927
Young Joe Yule Jr aka Mickey Rooney became well known as Mickey McGuire, the six year old in a role of a cocky, tough little kid has been still in the picture.

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

October 2010
Marin Sais & Pola Negri
=> Marin Sais was an American motion picture actress whose career was most prolific during the silent film era of the 1910s and 1920s. Marin Sais began her acting career as a teenager after travelling to New York City where she appeared in vaudeville. Throughout the 1910s, Sais' career continued to build momentum and showed her versatility by appearing in such varied genres as comedy shorts and dramas, but she is possibly best recalled for appearing in Western themed films.
=> Pola Negri was an American actress best known for her successful movie. She made her stage debut as an actress in Poland, and within a year she became a top screen star but moved to Berlin where she remained for five years, becoming internationally famous as the star of a number of major German films. Flooded with contract offers from Hollywood, she moved to America in 1923, and thus became Hollywood's first imported star. Her exotic, mysterious, passionate qualities caught on with American audiences, and she made numerous popular films.
on screen:

The man from Tia Juana • Marin Sais - 1917
The Spanish Dancer • Pola Negri - 1923

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

September 2010
The It Girl & Lulu
Between 1922 and 1929, Clara Bow's vitality and sexiness defined the liberated woman of the 1920s. Clara Bow (1906-1965) became one of Hollywood's brightest lights during this time. Clara was known as 'The "It" Girl'. "It" symbolized the tremendous progress women were making in society, and leading the way was Clara Bow, the girl of the year, who had "It" in abundance. She was also a thorough professional, and this was asserted by people who knew and worked with her, such as Louise Brooks (1906-1985) - the enigmatic and striking-looking actress with her distinctive hairstyle and Garbo-like mystique took the previous flapper model of the silly blonde or brunette jazz era baby onto a higher, more serious and sensual level. Both had a short career but continue to capture the imagination of new generations, their legacy lives on.
on screen:

Show Off • 1926
Plastic Age • 1925

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

August 2010
Old Time Avant Garde: Rohauer's Collection Gems
In the latter half of the 20th Century, Raymond Rohauer was one of the nation's foremost proponents of experimental cinema and by making the films in his personal archive available for commercial distribution, he helped preserve and promote avant-garde cinema. Mr. Rohauer developed a collection of more than 10,000 movies, spanning 75 years of film history and ranging from Mack Sennett comedies and German classics to rare silent movies starring Rudolph Valentino, Harry Langdon and Douglas Fairbanks Sr., he distributed many silent and early sound movies through his company, the Rohauer Collection.
on screen:

Le retour à la raison • Man Ray, France, 1923 - 2 min.
Emak-Bakia • Man Ray, France, 1926 - 16 min.
L'étoile de mer • Man Ray, France, 1928 - 15,5 min.
Les mystères du château du Dé • Man Ray, France, 1929 - 20 min.
The Life and Death of 9413, a Hollywood Extra • Slavko Vorkapich / Robert Florey, USA, 1928 - 13 min.

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

June 2010
Harold Lloyd: Unforgettable Character
Harold Lloyd ranks alongside Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton as one of the most popular and influential film comedians of the silent film era. Harold Lloyd began in motion pictures in 1913 and after making dozens of silent shorts, Lloyd graduated in writing, directing and starring in feature comedies becoming one of Hollywood's first movie stars. Lloyd's initial comic characterization was a tramp, but he found the idea that was to become his trademark, and changed him from a good comedian to a major star: the glasses. Lloyd shed grotesque comedy clothes and characterizations for a pair of horn-rimmed glasses, and in doing so, he created an American archetype: an optimistic and determined go-getter sporting spectacles and a toothy smile. Lloyd retained the "Glass Character" (as Lloyd called his comic persona) throughout the rest of his motion picture career, which spanned 34 years and over 200 comedies.
on screen:

The Freshman • 1925
The Kid Brother • 1927
Speedy • 1928

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

May 2010
Charlie Chaplin: The Circus
No need to introduce him: from old to new generation Charlie Chaplin is the universal clown. His figure is recognized and his comedy instantly understood by hundred of million people. This month on screen, "The Circus", one of the Little Tramp's most poignant roles, as well as one of Charlie Chaplin's funniest silent movie. Although the production of the film was the most difficult experience in Chaplin's career, it won Charles Chaplin his first Academy Award - it wasn't called 'Oscar' at the time - he received it at the first presentation ceremony, in 1929. This special award was for 'Versatility and genius in writing, acting, directing and producing'. The film certainly merited that honor. It contains some of his best comic inventions. Charlie Chaplin as "The Tramp" wonders into a traveling circus and inadvertently becomes the main attraction.
on screen:

The Circus • 1928

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

April 2010
Le Mime Marceau: "Don't say a word!"
For 70 years, this Frenchman embodied an art form without uttering a word! Marcel Marceau (1923-2007) has been acknowledged as the world's greatest practitioner of pantomime. Starting as a child mimic of Charlie Chaplin, whose "Little Tramp" character in silent films made him laugh and cry, Marceau by the age of 30 had became the singular embodiment of the ancient art of mime. He also took mime to a new dimension. One of his secrets was Marceau's ability to incorporate cinematic techniques. He became a worldwide figure, eventually giving 18,000 performances in over a hundred countries.
on screen:

Meet Marcel Marceau • 1965
Marcel Marceau, the red skeleton collection
Silent movie • 1976

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

March 2010
Jean Renoir: The least arrogant of all men
Jean Renoir, one of the greatest film directors of France, was born in Paris as the second son of the famous Impressionist painter Auguste Renoir, and his works were an inseparable part of Renoir's early years. In 1924, Renoir directed the first of his nine silent films, most of which starred his first wife, who was also his father's last model, Catherine Hessling. At this stage his films did not produce a return, and Renoir gradually sold paintings inherited from his father to finance them. His most creative period in the 1930s produced such masterworks as "The Grand Illusion", "The Human Beast", and "The Rules of the Game". Renoir was considered as a great humanist "the least arrogant of all men," who loved to quote Lavoisier: "In nature nothing is created, nothing is lost, everything is transformed."
on screen:

Whirlpool of fate • 1925
Nana • 1926
Charleston • 1927

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

February 2010
Le Mois de la Romance
A selection of various romantic movies from the silent era for you to enjoy while spending some sweet time at the lounge...
on screen:

The Italian straw hat • 1927 by René Clair
A delightful silent comedy about a bridegroom en route to the chapel when his hungry horse makes a meal out of a woman's elegant straw hat. Offended, she and her boyfriend demand the hat be replaced immediately--but will the wedding wait?
True heart Susie • 1919 by DW Griffith
The quaint tale of a quaint little country girl who waited, and waited, and waited... and finally got him when he became a sod-widower. A special treat for silent film enthusiasts and anyone who longs for some good old-fashioned, sentimental and charming love stories of days gone by.
Sunrise • 1927 by FW Murnau
A landmark of silent cinema and one of the finest films of any era. A woman from the city dazzles a married farmer in a small community and plots to rid him of his wife.
City Lights • 1931 by Charlie Chaplin
The tale of blind love again presents the famous Little Tramp character - an outcast, homeless man with his baggy pants, tight coat, cane, large shoes and small hat who first appeared in 1914. She thinks The Tramp is rich because she mistakenly believes she heard him exit a car, while she sits on a sidewalk corner. He buys a flower but soon the real owner of the car leaves, making her think The Tramp has left. At this moment Chaplin has become smitten with her. He vows to help her restore her sight by saving enough money so she can go to Vienna where a doctor has found a cure.

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

January 2010
Léonce Perret: A Prolific Avant-Garde Director
Lénce Perret was a prolific and innovative French film actor, director and producer. He also worked as a stage actor and director. As an actor he appeared in more than 100 films, but his greater contribution was as a director. While working at the Gaumont Film Company, he directed his first successful movie "The Child of Paris" in 1913, then moved on American soil where he produced several popular films, the most notable being "Lest We Forget" in 1918. Returning to France with an international success Léonce Perret collaborated with many of the French and American idols of his generation, and directed the first joint Franco-American film production. Often described as avant-garde for his unorthodox directing methods, Léonce Perret introduced innovative camera, lighting and film scoring techniques to French cinema.
on screen:

The mystery of the rocks of Kador • 1912
The child of Paris • 1913


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

December 2009
Holiday Season Classics
Christmas comes but once a year, a time of nostalgia about those Christmas movies everyone might have seen but not always in their old black & white version. "March of the Wooden Soldiers", first released in 1934 is one of Laurel and Hardy's most popular films, a true classic. Also on screen this month, a collection of nine early movies evoking the Victorian charm under the Christmas spirit, a staple for the holiday season.
on screen:

March of the Wooden Soldiers • 1934
A holyday pageant at home • 1901
A winter straw ride • 1906
A trap for Santa • 1909
A Christmas accident • 1912
The adventure of the wrong Santa Claus • 1914
Santa claus vs. Cupid • 1915
Santa Claus • 19125
A Christmas carol • 1918
The night before Christmas • 1905


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

November 2009
Louis Feuillade: Fantastic Realism
Louis Feuillade was one of the most solid and dependable talents in French cinema during the early twentieth century. At the beginning of 1905, he started to regularly sell screenplays to Gaumont, and soon got the chance to direct them himself and was appointed artistic director of the company until 1918, while at the same time continuing to produce his own films, so that by 1925, the year of his death, he estimated that he had made around 800 films. Feuillade worked in many genres, including comedy, realistic dramas and exotic adventures. But today he is most admired for his spectacular serials. Feuillade's work was labeled as "the fantastic realism" or the "social fantastic".
on screen:

A Very Fine Lady • 1908
Spring • 1909
The Fairy of the Surf • 1909
The Defect • 1911
The Roman Orgy • 1911
The Trust • 1911
The Heart and the Money • 1912
The Obsession • 1912
... and more


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

October 2009
Alice Guy-Blaché : A Pioneer Woman Film-maker
Alice Guy-Blaché was a French pioneer film-maker who was the first female director in the motion picture industry and is considered to be one of the first directors of a fiction film. Over twenty-five years she was involved directing, producing, writing and overseeing more than 700 films. Most of these films, produced by Guy for Gaumont before she moved to the US, reveal her to be an exceptional pioneer whose work stands alongside that of the Lumière Brothers, Georges Méliès, and Edwin S. Porter, in cinema's rapid growth from an optical illusion to a storytelling medium to an art form. Few individual artists have exerted as profound an influence upon the evolution of cinema as Alice Guy. It was commented on in publications of the era that Guy-Blaché placed a large sign in her studio reading "ACT NATURALLY".
on screen:
The Fisherman at the Stream • 1897
Bathing in a Stream • 1897
Serpentine Dance by Mme Bob Walter • 1897
The Turn-of-the-Century Blind Man • 1898
At the Hypnotist's • 1898
The Burglars • 1898
Disappearing Act • 1898
Surprise Attack on a House at Daybreak • 1898
At the Club • 1900
Wonderful Absinthe • 1900


Please note that the selection is subject to change.

September 2009
Charley Chase: From Vaudeville to Hollywood
Charley Chase was born Charles Joseph Parrott in Baltimore, Maryland on October 20, 1893. The young Charley worked odd jobs and entertained on street corners to support the family. He soon began performing in local theaters, becoming a neighborhood celebrity in the process. Around 1910, he struck out on the major vaudeville circuit, leaving Maryland and touring the US. Charley arrived in Hollywood in 1912 and started with Mack Sennett's Keystone Studio. He can be spotted in early Charles Chaplin films. He starred in a series of clever two-reel pictures, such as "Crazy like a Fox" and "Dog Shy" (both 1926). In 1929, he starred in two sophisticated and successful Universal silent features: "Movie Night" and "Modern Love". Charley survived the transition to sound smoothly and even sang in his early talkies. He co-starred in Laurel and Hardy's successful feature "Sons of the Desert" (1933). Charley finished his film career at Columbia Pictures, starring in more funny two-reelers and directing comedy stars such as The Three Stooges. He died of a heart attack on June 20th, 1940 in Hollywood, California at the age of 46.
on screen:
Peanuts and bullets • 1915
Love, loot, and crash • 1915
No father to guide him • 1925
The rat's knuckles • 1925
Outdoor pajamas • 1924
and more...

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

August 2009
This programmation replaces the one in June which had been cancelled due to a technical problem.
René Clair
After working for a while as a journalist, René Clair soon discovered a passion for cinema while acting in some of Louis Feuillade's films.  He made his first film in 1924, "Paris qui dort", a comic satire with a science-fiction theme. Clair developed his penchant for satirical surrealism in films which were highly regarded at the time and which are now considered to be masterpieces.  He made one film in Great Britain before moving to the United States where he directed half a dozen more down-to-earth films. René Clair is now universally regarded as one of the most significant figures in French cinema history. His wit, imagination and drive helped French cinema to maintain its pre-eminent position in the 1920s and 30s. To acknowledge this fact, he was elected to the French Academy in 1962, the first film director to receive this great accolade. Born in Belgium from a bourgeois family with a strong military tradition, when he announced he wanted to become an actor in 1907, his father forbade him to use his family name so he adopted pseudonym "Feyder". During the next two decades, Jacques Feyder's reputation as a filmmaker extraordinaire grew and his lyrical handling of realistic subject-matter created some of the finest French films of the 1920s. After a brief sojourn in Hollywood he assured his place as a key figure of "poetic realism".
on screen:
Paris qui dort • 1927 (René Clair)
Un chapeau de paille • 1928 (René Clair)
Crainquebille • 1922 (Jacques Feyder)
Visages d'enfants • 1925 (Jacques Feyder)

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

July 2009
Le Tour de France: La Grande Boucle en Direct
The original concept of a cycling race through the country has started in 1903. Covering a distance of 2500 km, taking place for three weeks in several stages and rankings based on the cumulative time over the course of the tour. What makes this race special are not only the physical demand and the consistency you need to win that competition, but the tough stretches of biking trough the Alps, the Massif Central and the Pyrénées mountains. Among many famous winners are Jacques Anquetil, Eddie Mercks, Bernard Hinault, Greg Lemon & Lance Armstrong.
On this occasion, we will feature daily specials related to each region of France the Tour will go through.

on screen:
1. Contre-la-montre individuel samedi 4 juillet Monaco > Monaco (15.5 km)
2. Plaine dimanche 5 juillet Monaco > Brignoles (187 km)
3. Plaine lundi 6 juillet Marseille > La Grande-Motte (196.5 km)
4. Clm / équipe mardi 7 juillet Montpellier > Montpellier (39 km)
5. Plaine mercredi 8 juillet Le Cap d'Agde > Perpignan (196.5 km)
6. Plaine jeudi 9 juillet Gérone > Barcelone (181.5 km)
7. Haute montagne vendredi 10 juillet Barcelone > Andorre Arcalis (224 km)
8. Haute montagne samedi 11 juillet Andorre-la-Vieille > Saint-Girons (176.5 km)
9. Haute montagne dimanche 12 juillet Saint-Gaudens > Tarbes (160.5 km)
- Repos lundi 13 juillet Limoges
10. Plaine mardi 14 juillet Limoges > Issoudun (194.5 km)
11. Plaine mercredi 15 juillet Vatan > Saint-Fargeau (192 km)
12. Plaine jeudi 16 juillet Tonnerre > Vittel (211.5 km)
13. Moyenne montagne vendredi 17 juillet Vittel > Colmar (200 km)
14. Plaine samedi 18 juillet Colmar > Besançon (199 km)
15. Haute montagne dimanche 19 juillet Pontarlier > Verbier (207.5 km)
- Repos lundi 20 juillet Verbier
16. Haute montagne mardi 21 juillet Martigny > Bourg-Saint-Maurice (159 km)
17. Haute montagne mercredi 22 juillet Bourg-Saint-Maurice > Le Grand-Bornand (169.5 km)
18. Contre-la-montre individuel jeudi 23 juillet Annecy > Annecy (40.5 km)
19. Plaine vendredi 24 juillet Bourgoin-Jallieu > Aubenas (178 km)
20. Haute montagne samedi 25 juillet Montélimar > Mont Ventoux (167 km)
21. Plaine dimanche 26 juillet Montereau-Fault-Yonne > Paris Champs-Élysées (164 km)

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

June 2009
René Clair
After working for a while as a journalist, René Clair soon discovered a passion for cinema while acting in some of Louis Feuillade's films.  He made his first film in 1924, "Paris qui dort", a comic satire with a science-fiction theme. Clair developed his penchant for satirical surrealism in films which were highly regarded at the time and which are now considered to be masterpieces.  He made one film in Great Britain before moving to the United States where he directed half a dozen more down-to-earth films. René Clair is now universally regarded as one of the most significant figures in French cinema history. His wit, imagination and drive helped French cinema to maintain its pre-eminent position in the 1920s and 30s. To acknowledge this fact, he was elected to the French Academy in 1962, the first film director to receive this great accolade. Born in Belgium from a bourgeois family with a strong military tradition, when he announced he wanted to become an actor in 1907, his father forbade him to use his family name so he adopted pseudonym "Feyder". During the next two decades, Jacques Feyder's reputation as a filmmaker extraordinaire grew and his lyrical handling of realistic subject-matter created some of the finest French films of the 1920s. After a brief sojourn in Hollywood he assured his place as a key figure of "poetic realism".
on screen:
Paris qui dort • 1927 (René Clair)
Un chapeau de paille • 1928 (René Clair)
Crainquebille • 1922 (Jacques Feyder)
Visages d'enfants • 1925 (Jacques Feyder)

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

May 2009
Georges Méliès: le "Cinémagicien"
Georges Méliès was one of the most important pioneers of early cinema. Before making films, he was a stage magician but became interested in movies after seeing a demonstration of the Lumière brothers' camera. Méliès built the world's first movie studio near Paris; from it cascaded fantastic magic films, dream films, historical reconstructions, imaginary journeys, melodramas, and slapstick comedies - even erotic films. He directed 531 films between 1896 and 1914, ranging in length from one to fourty minutes. Due to his ability to seemingly manipulate and transform reality with the cinematography, Méliès is sometimes referred to as the "Cinemagician."
on screen:
First Wizard of Cinema
Various Work • 1896-1913

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

April 2009
Ben Turpin, Snub Pollard et les autres: Forgotten Pioneers
The silent screen comedy is more than the acknowledged masters like Chaplin, Keaton, and Lloyd... The selection we have made this month is to honor the significant work of the pioneers that have been long forgotten like Snub Pollard or Ben Turpin known for his severely crossed eyes...
on screen:
Idle Eyes • 1928 - featuring Ben Turpin
Just Rambling Along • 1918 - featuring Stan Laurel
The Janitor • 1919 - featuring Hank Mann
All Jazzed Up • 1920 - featuring Bobby Vernon
The Bath Dub • 1921 - featuring Billy Franey
The Big Idea • 1924 - featuring Snub Pollard
The Prodigal Bridegroom • 1926 - featuring Ben Turpin
The Paper Hangers • 1921 - featuring Al St John
The Bell Hop • 1919 - featuring Hank Mann
The Friend Husband • 1924 - featuring Snub Pollard
The Golf Nut • 1927 - featuring Billy Bevan
Hello Sailor • 1927 - featuring Lupino Lane
Too Much Dough • 1927 - featuring Billy West

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

March 2009
Charlot et les Femmes: Chaplin's Ladies
Charlie Chaplin loved women. He had 4 wives, 11 children and many romances. Most of these ladies were actresses and some of them shared the screen with him, but have an impressive career on their own. His first major leading partners after Mabel Normand were Edna Purviance, Lita Grey, Georgia Hale and Paulette Goddard. And also Mildred Harris, Pola Negris, Marion Davis who had a role in his romantic life and films.
on screen:
Tillie's Punctured Romance • 1914 - with Mabel Normand
Dog's Life • 1918 - with Edna Purviance
The Kid • 1921 - with Lita Grey
The Gold Rush • 1925 - with Georgia Hale
Modern Time • 1936 - with Paulette Goddard

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

February 2009
Silent Romance: Watch and Sip for Two
There are few silent era romantic movies available to share with your Valentine. But we did manage to select a couple of them.
on screen:
City Lights • 1931 - Charlie Chaplin
My Best Girl • 1927 - Mary Pickford

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

January 2009
The Black Pearl: Fêtons "La Baker"
Joséphine Baker was given the nicknames the "Bronze Venus" or the "Black Pearl", as well as the "Creole Goddess" in English-speaking countries. In France, she has always been known as "La Baker". While she met a moderate success in the US, her new venture in Paris with "La Revue Nègre" proved to be a turning point in her career, and virtually an instant hit, an overnight sensation. Josephine Baker became one of the best-known entertainers in both France and much of Europe. Her jaw-dropping performance, including a costume of 16 bananas strung into a skirt, cemented her celebrity status. Josephine rivaled Gloria Swanson and Mary Pickford as the most photographed woman in the world. Overcoming the limitations imposed by the color of her skin, she became one of the world's most versatile entertainers, performing on stage, screen and recordings. She was a humanitarian, a French resistant during World War II. La Baker was a civil rights activist who refused to perform for segregated audiences and integrated the Las Vegas nightclubs. She adopted twelve children from around the world whom she called her "Rainbow Tribe." She became the first American woman to receive French military honors at her funeral.
on screen:
La Revue des Revues • 1927
Siren of the Tropics • 1927
Zou Zou • 1934
Princess Tam Tam • 1935

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

December 2008
Christmas Nostalgia: Remembering Dickens
'Tis the season to celebrate and this will be the month featuring Christmas movies at the lounge. We also wanted to pay tribute to Charles Dickens. As a prolific 19th Century author of short stories, plays, novellas, novels, fiction and none, during his lifetime Dickens became known over the world for his remarkable characters, his mastery of prose in the telling of their lives, and his depictions of the social classes, mores and values of his times. The popularity of Dickens' novels and short stories has meant that they have never gone out of print. "A Christmas Carol" was published on December 19, 1843. The first of the author's five Christmas books, the story was an instant success, selling over six thousand copies in one week, and the tale has become one of the most popular and enduring Christmas stories of all time. Charles Dickens has probably had more influence on the way that we celebrate Christmas today than any single individual in human history. Christmas Carol was written during a time of decline in the old Christmas traditions.
on screen:
Christmas carol & Old Scrooge • 1923
A holyday pageant at home • 1901
A winter straw ride • 1906
A trap for Santa • 1909
A Christmas accident • 1912
The adventure of the wrong Santa Claus • 1914
Santa Claus • 1925
The night before Christmas • 1905
Santa Claus vs Cupid • 1915

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

November 2008
Larry Semon: The Comic Shooting Star
Larry Semon was a film comedian during the silent era, at the time considered a "Comedy King" played a white-faced goof in derby hat and overalls, who would enter any given setting and cause chaos. No gag was too big and a typical Semon comedy might involve barrels of flour, soot, ink, jam, mud pits, etc. He gained an international reputation and at his peak rivaled the popularity of Charlie Chaplin and Harold Lloyd, and was among the most popular and highly paid comedians. French audiences knew him as Zigoto. Former cartoonist, Semon joined Vitagraph in 1916 as a writer and director and found success making short films comedy, but Semon's fiscal irresponsibility lead to bankruptcy and a genius was lost in the silent movie world. Most film historians, when they discuss him at all, are usually doing so in regard to two of his supporting players, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. Any other references will refer to his "tragic" qualities, his early death, his inability to create a truly memorable comic character, and his extravagance. Yet what most of us fail to realize was just how popular he was at the time.
The perfect clown • 1925
Move along • 1925
The bell hop • 1921
The sawmill • 1922
Dunces and dangers • 1918
Kid Speed • 1924
The stunt man • 1927

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

October 2008
Max Linder: Chaplin's Teacher
Today Max Linder is probably one of the least known silent comedy actors and filmmakers, but his influence upon the medium of film was profound. He predated all the more well known silent film clowns, and his influence was clearly seen in their comedy years later. Called "my teacher" by Charles Chaplin, Max Linder was born in Gironde, France on December 16th, 1883. Making his screen debut in 1905 in a film for Pathé he quickly became a famous and successful film comedian to audiences in both Europe and America, and may be considered the first international movie star.
Seven years of bad luck • 1920
Troubles of a grasswidower • 1908
Love's surprises, Max takes a picture • 1913
Be my wife • 1921
Les Frères Lumière: la naissance du cinéma
Louis and Auguste Lumière were pioneer contributors to the birth of film-making and held their first private screening of projected motion pictures in 1895. Months later, the showing of approximately ten short films lasting only twenty minutes in total would be the very first public demonstration of their device they called the "cinématographe" which effectively functioned as camera, projector and printer all in one. The first experimentation by Louis Lumière showed everyday real events, and for this reason they believed that "The cinema is an invention with no future." The Lumière brothers have been credited with over 1,425 different short films and had even filmed aerial shots years before the very first airplane would take to the skies.
Demolition of a wall • 1895
Leaving the factory • 1895
Mont Blanc, the Alps • 1897
Place du pont • 1896
Serpentine dance • 1895
Pillow fight • 1897
...and more

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

September 2008
W.C. Fields: a juggler misanthrope
Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on January 29th, 1889, W.C. Fields had a tragic childhood. The son of a poor Cockney immigrant and an American mother, he ran away from home at the age of eleven due to abuse, surviving by his wits. He dreamed of being a great juggler and it was this skill that allowed him to break into show business. By the age of twenty he was a comic star in vaudeville. In Paris, he starred at the Folies-Bergères along with Charles Chaplin and Maurice Chevalier, and had a string of successes in musical on Broadway. Fields' first movie was made in 1915 for Mutual; he was thirty-six years old, and also began writing his own screenplays. Most of Fields' films were "acquired tastes", more often praised by the critics than favored by the public. Many of his routines were improvised, which was often difficult for the other actors performing with him to follow. His characters were mostly cynics and misanthropes, persecuted by authority figures, and henpecked by critical wives. Dead in 1946, W.C. Fields is perhaps more popular today than he was during the peak of his long and successful career in show business.
Some of the following are not silent movies.

Poll Sharks • 1915
The Golf Specialist • 1930
The Dentist • 1932
The Fatal Glass of Beer • 1932
The Pharmacist • 1933
The Barber Shop • 1933
It's a Gift • 1934
International House • 1935
You Can't Cheat an Honest Man • 1939
My Little Chickadee • 1940
The Bank Dick • 1940

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

August 2008
Mabel Normand: the "Female Chaplin"
Born in New Brighton, Staten Island, New York, she was certainly the most popular screen comedienne of the silent film era. The daughter of a vaudeville musician, she began modeling for artists and photographers, but Normand quickly demonstrated a flair for comedy and became a star of Sennett's short films. Mickey (1918) was a smash hit. Mabel would do anything to make her films successful. She appeared in over 100 2-reel films and also directed films staring Charles Chaplin and Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle. Mabel also wrote, directed, and starred in Mabel's Married Life (1914), Mabel's Busy Day (1914), Caught in a Cabaret (1914). As she was getting older with her career, she began a downward slide, becoming addicted to wild all-night parties, alcohol and cocaine. Her later career was marked by several successive scandals, including the murder of director William Desmond Taylor. She married actor Lew Cody in 1926, but would carry on her partying. In 1929, as her health declined, Mabel entered a sanitarium and remained there for six months, dying from tuberculosis at the age of 34.
Mickey • 1918
Suzanna • 1922
He did and he didn't • 1916
The Extra Girl/The Gusher • 1913
Tillie's punctured romance • 1914

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

July 2008
La Grande Boucle: Le Tour de France
In pursuit of the Yellow Jersey, or the Tour de France. The original concept of a race through the country has started in 1903. Covering a distance of 2500 km, taking place for three weeks in several stages and rankings based on the cumulative time over the course of the tour. What makes this race special are not only the physical demand and the consistency you need to win that competition, but the tough stretches of biking trough the Alps, the Massif Central and the Pyrénées mountains. Among many famous winners are Jacques Anquetil, Eddie Mercks, Bernard Hinault, Greg Lemon & Lance Armstrong.
On this occasion, we will feature daily specials related to each region of France the Tour will go through.

Les triplettes de Belleville
Vive le Tour
Le Tour - 100 ans
Le Tour de France 1999-2005

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

June 2008
Roscoe Arbuckle: The Balloonatic
Roscoe Conkling Arbuckle was born in Smith Center, Kansas, on March 24, 1887, weighing 14 pounds. His father, William Goodrich Arbuckle, named but the elder Arbuckle thought Roscoe was illegitimate, and beat him constantly. The Arbuckles moved to Santa Ana, California, in the autumn of 1888. In 1899, Roscoe's mother, Mollie, died. He was shortly thereafter abandoned by his father. Roscoe survived by doing odd jobs at a hotel in San Jose. Singing while working in the kitchen, he caught the attention of a performer singing at the hotel. She took him to the neighborhood theatre, to perform on amateur night. He won, caught the attention of showman David Grauman, and soon Roscoe was in Vaudeville, as a singer and dancer. In 1913, Roscoe decided to try his luck at Keystone. Films had suddenly come into vogue, and since Roscoe had experience from working at Selig, he decided to give it another try. Starting with "The Gangsters" (April, 1913), Roscoe quickly became one of the most popular figures at Keystone. With the "Comique" films, Arbuckle reached his artistic peak. In 1919 Roscoe would be moved permanently from shorts into features. No other male "slapstick" comedian had yet done that. During the next eighteen months, Roscoe would star in nine features. Understandably, making new features at the rate of six a year caused a drop in quality. By silent comedy standards, they are poor. After a short vacation to San Francisco in September 1921, Arbuckle was arrested and was held over for manslaughter on flimsy evidence. He was later proved innocent. Nevertheless, the damage was done. Roscoe Arbuckle would be blacklisted from acting in Hollywood for the next eleven years. In 1925, it was decided in Hollywood that Roscoe would be allowed to direct comedies, as long as he didn't use his real name. Finally, on the tenth anniversary of the scandal, Motion Picture magazine wrote the article "Doesn't Fatty Arbuckle Deserve a Break?" signed by dozens of film stars. The response from fans was overwhelmingly positive - they demanded Roscoe Arbuckle be returned to the screen. After years of hard work, Hollywood could no longer deny Roscoe Arbuckle's contributions to the film industry. In early 1932, Arbuckle was signed by Jack Warnerto star in six two-reel comedies but On June 29, 1933, Roscoe Arbuckle died from heart failure, after a night of celebrating. Arbuckle is the only person to have the honor of having the three greatest silent film comedians, Chaplin, Harold Lloyd, and Buster Keaton, appear in supporting roles in his films. Chaplin assists Roscoe in "The Knockout," Lloyd is Roscoe's co-star in "Miss Fatty's Seaside Lovers," and Keaton supported Roscoe in at least fourteen shorts under Arbuckle's "Comique" banner.
Fatty Joins the Force • 1913
Fatty and Mabel's Simple Life • 1915
Fatty's Plucky Pup • 1915
Coney Island • 1917
Leap Year • 1922
Bridge Wives • 1932
and many more...

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

May 2008
Harry Langdon: The Sad Clown
Born in Council Bluffs, Iowa on June 15th, 1884 silent film comedian Harry Langdon ran away from home at the age of twelve to join a traveling medicine show. He had a long-term success in vaudeville with a running act called "Johnny's New Car" which he performed for twenty years on stage. Harry also performed in circuses, minstrel shows, and burlesque. In 1924 he signed with Mack Sennett's Keystone Studios, making his film debut in a comedy called "Picking Peaches". It was at Keystone that he had his primary success as a film comedian. Although Harry's humor was not the typical slapstick style that Sennett featured in his other films, he sensed that Harry had a unique talent all his own, and he assigned top writers and directors to work with him, including the writer Arthur Ripley, and the young directors Harry Edwards and Frank Capra. They developed Harry's innocent childlike man with the powdered face and the big staring eyes into a huge success at the box office. Most of the laughs were obtained through creating scenarios which featured Harry's character in helpless or dangerous situations, while he tried desperately to save himself through pathetic, childlike means. Harry Langdon's babyish character didn't adapt well to sound films; as producer Hal Roach remarked, "he was not so funny articulate." But Langdon was a big enough name to command leads in short subjects for Educational Pictures and Columbia Pictures. Upon his death, The New York Times wrote, "His whole appeal was a consummate ability to look inexpressibly forlorn when confronted with manifold misfortunes-usually of the domestic type. He was what was known as 'dead-pan'... the feeble smile and owlish blink which had become his stock-in-trade caught on in a big way, and he skyrocketed to fame and fortune."
Picking Peaches • 1924
Smile please • 1924
His new Mamma • 1924
The first 100 Years • 1924
Luck'o the Foolish • 1924
All Night Long • 1924
Boobs in the Wood • 1925
His Marriage • 1925
Plain Clothes • 1925
The Strong Man • 1926
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp • 1926
Satirday Afternoon • 1926
Fiddlesticks • 1926
Long Pants • 1927
His First Flame • 1927
Knight Duty • 1933

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

April 2008
Buster Keaton: The "Great Stone Face" of the silent screen
Joseph Francis 'Buster' Keaton (October 4, 1895 - February 1, 1966) was an Academy Award-winning American silent film comic actor and film maker. His trademark was physical comedy with a stoic, dead pan expression on his face, earning him the nickname "The Great Stone Face". Buster Keaton was born into a vaudeville family. At the age of three, Buster began performing with his parents in "The Three Keatons". Keaton's silent films are characterized by clever visual gags and technical trickery.
The Butcher Boy • 1917
Coney Island • 1917
Roll dance • 1917
The Bell Boy • 1918
Moonshine • 1918
Out West • 1918
Good Night, Nurse! • 1918
The Hayseed • 1919
Back Stage • 1919
The Garage • 1919
The Paleface • 1921
Hard Luck • 1921
Spite Marriage • 1923
The General • 1926
The Cameraman • 1928
Free And Easy • 1930
Parlor, Bedroom & Bath • 1931
Speak Easily • 1932
Allez Oop • 1934
Jail Bait • 1937

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

March 2008
Laurel and Hardy: the most famous duo of the 20th century
Laurel & Hardy ("The Boys" as they are affectionately known) had each a long solo career before becoming the most recognized comedy duo the cinema has produced.
The paperhangers helper • (Oliver Hardy) 1915
The sawmill • (Oliver Hardy) 1921
Hop to it, Bellhop • (Oliver Hardy) 1922
Kid speed • (Oliver Hardy) 1924
Yes, Yes nanette • (Oliver Hardy) 1926
Enough to do • (Oliver Hardy) 1926
The Hobo • (Oliver Hardy) 1917
The show • (Oliver Hardy) 1922
The Soilers • (Stan Laurel) 1923
White Wings • (Stan Laurel) 1923
Should sailors marry? • (Oliver Hardy) 1925
Thundering Fleas • (Oliver Hardy) 1926
Short kilts • (Stan Laurel) 1924
Smithy • (Stan Laurel) 1924
Along came Auntie • (Oliver Hardy) 1926
Mud and sand • (Stan Laurel) 1923
Oranges and Lemons • (Stan Laurel) 1923
West of the Hot Dog • (Stan Laurel) 1924
Bromo and Juliet • (Oliver Hardy) 1926
Crazy like a Fox • (Oliver Hardy) 1926
The home Wecker • (Stan Laurel) 1924
Tha four wheeled terror • (Oliver Hardy) 1924
Roughest Africa • (Stan Laurel) 1923
Crazy to act • (Oliver Hardy) 1927
In duo
Lucky dog • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1917
The stolen Jools • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1931
Liberty • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1929
We faw Down • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1928
Love'em and weep • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1927
That My Wife • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1929
Flying elephants • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1928
Putting Pants on Philip • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1928
45 Minutes from Hollywood • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1926
They Go Boom • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1929
Their Purple Moment • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1928
Bacon grabbers • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1929
Unaccustomed As We Are • (Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy) 1929

Please note that the selection is subject to change.

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